I was just going to post this as a link on Twitter, but there’s a problem: TechCrunch is hosted by WordPress.com, so there’s reason to believe that the site may not be up all that often today.

WordPress.com Suffers “Extremely Large” DDoS Attack.

The linked-to blog article gives no indication what prompted the attack – if anything – and more worrisome: no indication if this is a traditional DDOS or if a WordPress software exploit is responsible. This website, of course, is proudly powered by WP, though I may live to regret that statement by the end of the day.

For those of you who do not yet know, the latest version of WordPress will eliminate the “Links” altogether in favour of adding the Links to their own separate Category. That means that, instead of having a separate list of “Links” with it’s typically unfathomable and irritatingly option-free set of controls, you will maintain your list through the use of another Category and presumably subCategories as well.

Now, I know what some of you less experienced folks are thinking: holy crap, they’re going to strand me and delete my links that I’ve taken six years to develop!!! Fear not, gentle reader. I’m sure that they intend to make the transition easier by migrating them over for you, but if not, I’m sure someone else will develop just such a tool for you lickety-split.

Personally, I detest the Links structure and would much rather the greater freedom allowed Categories present from a development perspective. I’m also more than a little curious just how the Links fit into the Categories. I’ll probably install WP2.1 on a Dev server and see what it looks like before installing on my Production server. Plus, I’m going to need to know how to alter my Collapsing Categories Widget to accomodate the new schema.

Hmmm. . . . Maybe I’ll even. . . . Well, better not spoil the surprise.

UPDATE: Well, I’ve done it now: I’ve joined the WordPress Tester’s mailing list, so now I’ll have a way to download the new version and see how it works. Sweetness!

While we all anxiously await the release of WordPress 2.1 (which is going to kick ass, let me tell you!), the folks over at the WordPress development group have discovered a vulnerability in PHP, various versions of builds 4 and 5 both, which makes patching WordPress a necessity.? Apparently, there has been an issue with the UNREGISTER_GLOBALS keyword with these versions that has made for some pretty serious vulnerabilities, as those of you with a few years coding experience can probably imagine.

Do not wait!? Patch your site up NOW!? It may not become an issue for you, ever, but this is the kind of thing that lends itself to bot-style automation, and it may not be you that gets affected.? Patch it now.

Please note that this page has been moved!!! Whilst I work out the redirection, you can check out the new Page created to handle this Widget. I will eventually be moving all the comments from this article over to the new page, but that’s going to have to wait until the weekend, donchaknow. . .

Thank you, thank you, thank you to all those who have supported and installed this Widget. I get to see what blogs use it, and that rocks!

The folks at WordPress sent out a friendly warning to developers and bloggers alike: the new version of WP is going to have some significant changes to it’s core, and they’re very likely to affect plugins:

Development Blog ? Is your plugin Naughty or Nice?

WordPress 2.1 is almost here and you know what that means for developers. It?s time to pull out those old plugins you?ve had stashed, blow off the dust and start applying some spit and polish and make sure it will last longer than Grandma?s Ham and Bean soup that has been sitting in the refrigerator for weeks. Many of the big changes in WordPress 2.1 are MySQL related so grab a pen and paper (or open Notepad) and start taking notes.

I have to say that I’m a bit confused as to why a new version that makes such significant changes to the database constitutes a sub-version rather than an entirely new WP3.0, but I guess if its your product, you get to name it what you want.  In any event, plugin-monkeys like myself need to pay special attention to the changes found here so we can be ready.  I don’t often write my own plugins, but I’ve got one widgetized plugin that’s out there for public consumption, and I use TONS of plugins to make this page work.

The big thing is that when you upgrade you pay careful attention to the directions they give out for all new versions: make sure you disable all your plugins before upgrading, and make sure you turn them on one at a time to find out which ones work with the new version and which ones do not.  That last bit is critical this time, because if the developer used the now-eliminated wp_ functions, it’s likely to crash your blog with an ugly SQL error and eliminate your ability to access even the Admin area.

It’s a shame that they cannot develop a version of WP that does not crash so hard.  It seems like it should be possible to create WP such that it exits gracefully and at least gives you access to the Admin area when the shit hits the fan, but I presume that it is not, in fact, possible.  Forcing the inexperienced to delete files through FTP takes them well outside of the GUI world you gave them, which probably causes a fair amount of anxiety in the noobies out there.

So, put that on my wish-list along with a customizable Admin page.  Give me those two, and I’m all set.

Technorati Tags: ,

powered by performancing firefox

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.

Whoopha, talk about pathetic.

I decided to comment on an article and realized I would need to setup an account to do so.? That’s really stupid in the first place, but then I realized why, and OM-freakin’-G, is it lame:

The D and C is using phpBB to provide it’s commenting software.

Mind you: phpBB is a perfectly acceptable forum application that I used for quite a while on this website.? However, the fact remains that, of my two largest reasons for dumping it, the main one was that it can’t really be made to be really compatible with blogging or with commenting.? It’s just it’s own thing unto itself and will not be made a part of anything else without a ton of coding.

And after you’ve gotten done doing all that coding, you would have done yourself as many favours by simply creating the commenting code yourself.? Or found some way to integrate WordPress like half a million other commercially-owned news websites.? I’m guessing that there aren’t very many web developers over there at the D&C, or if there are, they’ve got one of those dumb-ass bosses that gets an idea sold to him and then acts as though he’s left The Mount with the answer directly from God.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that they have an utterly pathetic RSS feed such that it’s more sensible to go to the page than to check the feed; not bad enough that they use outdated, unordered and insecure query information in the URL; not bad enough that they have no perma-link structure to support referencing an article more than a few weeks old; now, they’re using ten-year-old technology to affect a three-year-old, long passed-over trend.

Maybe they should just stick to print.